A Letter from IAF President Larissa Niec

I’m delighted to share news of the Interstitial Arts Foundation’s movement and growth this past year. With your help, we were able to lend our support and promotion to more artists, reach wider audiences in new locations, and begin an exciting new project. As we head into 2013, I invite you to join us by renewing your membership and coming to one of our salons or town halls (or hosting one!) The Interstitial Arts Foundation (IAF) is a non-profit group dedicated to the study, support, and promotion of art that crosses borders, working to break down the many barriers—commercial or creative—that...

William S. Yellow Rove, Jr. at Space on White!

Sometimes genre cannot hold an artist, and their gift for telling a story spontaneously overrides the confines of traditional form. William S. Yellow Robe, Jr., is just such an artist, and on Friday night an excited audience jammed Space on White in New York City to celebrate his work. Many of us in New York spend any evenings of our lives in readings of work in progress, whether it is poetry, fiction, music, or theater, and once in a while, you walk into something exciting just because it is so unexpected. I attended an event called W’anishi (Thank You in Lenape),...

Stand-Up Tragedy

This week, the play Stand-Up Tragedy opens in the East Village in Nativity Church, the actual church where the final scene takes place and where the playwright Bill Cain, who is also a Jesuit priest, once ministered. The concept of both play and production is interstitial—using the idea of stand-up comedy, but standing it on its head, telling a fact based story of a new teacher in a Lower East Side Catholic school where “You can tell the new residents of the neighborhood by how high they jump when a gun goes off.” The young priest has ideas of “starting a new...

The Butterfly Kidd

Chester Anderson’s entire career was nothing if not interstitial. Born in 1932, he was part of the Beat Scene in Greenwich Village and North Beach. He published three books of poetry and several little magazines. He performed as a musician, playing two-part inventions with two recorders simultaneously. He wrote rock criticism and later edited several issues of Crawdaddy! Prior to writing The Butterfly Kid, he co-authored Ten Years to Doomsday with Michael Kurland. In Haight-Ashbury, in 1967 he was one of the co-founders of The Communications Company, the publishing arm of the Diggers, and wrote extensively about what was going on during the Summer of...

The Language of Cats

Written by Ron Bass This is the second in our series on rediscovered interstitial works by writer Ron Bass. Although not capable of being subjected to any kind of quantitative test, I have no doubts about the accuracy of the following proposition: After the death of its creator, an interstitial work of the first rank is more likely to be lost to future generations than a work of equal rank that resides within a clearly-defined genre. Spencer Holst (1925 – 2001) was a writer whose interstitial works were widely appreciated during his lifetime; but only a dozen years after his death...

Charles Wright

Written by Ron Bass Charles Wright was born in 1933 and published three books within a decade: The Messenger (1963), The Wig (1966), and Absolutely Nothing to Get Alarmed About (1973).  All are riveting. The first book is a relatively conventional novel. The second is an alternative present novel and a scathing satire that is definitely interstitial. The third, which is the topic at hand, is nearly unclassifiable, although I think it reads like a novel. The book flaps of Absolutely Nothing to Get Alarmed About contain blurbs from Kay Boyle, Anthony Burgess, Ishmael Reed, and Clarence Major. Burgess writes: “It would diminish Charles Wright to call him...

Interview with Bobby Previte

Interstitial Arts is excited to bring you this interview with composer/performer Bobby Previte. Bobby has worked with for/with creators as diverse as John Adams, Terry Adams, Robert Altman, Johnny Copeland, Lejaren Hiller, Charlie Hunter, Lenny Kaye, John Lurie, Sonny Sharrock, Michael Tilson-Thomas, Tom Waits, Victoria Williams, and possibly Iggy Pop (though he can’t quite remember that.) He has recorded on Sony, Nonesuch, Palmetto, Gramavision, Enja, Thirsty Ear, New World, Ropeadope, Veal, Spaceborne, and received the Guggenheim Fellowship. He’s in the midst of creating a recording of his highly interstitial work Terminals and took a few minutes to speak with IAF Board member...

Interfictions Issue #3 Is Up Online!

The editors of Interfictions Online are happy to announce the birth of the journal’s latest issue, on May 22, 2014! The Spring 2014 issue’s non-fiction offerings include Mark Craddock’s poignant collage in Aerial Acrobatics and Gender Reassignment Surgery – A How-To Guide, while Inda Lauryn’s Parallels and Transitions splices analysis of contemporary female vocalists into a graduate school memoir. Isabel Yap’s Life Is Not a Shoujo Manga speaks for itself. And in an interview with Jeff VanderMeer and Jeremy Zerfoss, the two creators discuss their illustrated guide to writing, Wonderbook. The fiction offerings remix tropes from ghosts to automata, with new work by Richard Butner, Su-Yee Lin, Kat Howard, Tade Thompson and S. Craig Renfroe Jr. Several of...

IAF Interfictions Online Indiegogo Campaign Ends Above Target Goal

Thanks to 277 generous backers for our Interfictions Indiegogo Campaign, we raised $10,318 by the time our campaign ended at midnight, July 14th, 2014.  When we launched on June 3rd, we were staggered to find donations doubling almost daily, until after about 3 weeks we had reached our original target goal of $8,500, and were able to move on to our Stretch Goal of $10,000. Which means we not only get to publish Interfictions Online for another year, but we can pay our contributors at higher rates now, rates more in line with the effort and talent that innovation requires. Thank you, each and every one of the...

Interview with Author/Editor Mike Allen

This week we revisit Interstitial Author/Editor Mike Allen, well known in our community for creating and editing Clockwork Phoenix and Mythic Delirum to learn about his current projects and the success of his recent crowdfunding campaigns. IAF: Can you re-introduce yourself and give us a little background on who you are and what you do? Sure! I’m a journalist, novelist, poet, occasional visual artist, and most relevant to the Interstitial Arts Foundation, an editor and publisher. I’ve been curating my own idiosyncratic assortments of weird fiction and poetry for a couple decades now. My best known project is without a doubt the Clockwork Phoenix anthology series, which...